Nos films / some of our films

Être chinois au Québec ready to hit the big screen

After three years work and many adventures, the feature-length documentary, Être chinois au Québec (Being Chinese in Quebec), is ready to present to the public.

Hing Dere Head Tax CertificateDirected by Malcolm Guy and William Ging Wee Dere and presenting Parker Mah and Bethany Or, the film follows a road movie adventure across Québec to take the pulse of the Chinese community in the wake of the 2006 apology by the Canadian government for the serious past injustices of the head tax and Exclusion Act.

Edited by Meiyen Chan and complemented by the music of Quebec-based musicians Janet Lumb, Gino Diancola and Kid Koala, this surprising and revealing film is 70 min in length and is sub-titled in French and English. A shorter version of the film will be broadcast by Canal D later this year. The film was produced for Productions Multi-Monde by Malcolm Guy and Marlene Edoyan. The producers would like to take this occasion to thank all those who have helped make this film a reality, with a special recognition to our community advisers, May Chiu and Walter Tom.

We are planning to tour with the film visiting schools and community groups in 2013. If you would like to participate in the tour or would like to acquire a copy of the film for institutional or educational use, please contact Marie Boti at our distributor, Diffusion Multi-Monde. DVDs for individual use will be available in March 2013 via the Diffusion Multi-Monde website.

Malcolm Guy
Co-director / Producer

Original article appeared on Être chinois au Québec blog: http://etrechinoisauquebec.net/
Also see Être chinois au Québec Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/etrechinoisauquebec/

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The End of the Documentary? · Montreal Serai

a comment by Marie Boti & Malcolm Guy

FDI - children Baguio

Still from film “The End of Immigration”

As we prepare to release our latest documentary, The End of Immigration? we wonder whether it will be our last, with the new round of funding cuts from the federal government that has this sector reeling. The hunger for documentaries is higher that ever as people search for critical analysis to understand the forces shaping the world and their role in changing it. The government appears desperate to gag media and other sources that stimulate this reflection, including education and culture.

Our film The End of Immigration? signals the end of an era in the way this country was built, with its increased reliance on temporary foreign workers – “rent a workers”, compared with the 1950’s when our own working class parents came to Canada as immigrants. Are we simultaneously witnessing the end of the documentary, and documentary financing that made Canada a founder and pillar of this art form?

Read more at : The End of the Documentary? · Montreal Serai.

See also review of the film “The End of Immigration” in Montreal Serai

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“The end of immigration?” – a review · Montreal Serai

Film review by Rana Bose (Montreal Serai) of newest documentary by Marie Boti and Malcolm Guy

The end of immigration ? - tower rigger

Still from The End of Immigration?

The wind beats against a high telecom tower in Quebec. The camera finds a man on top of the tower, hard hat, safety glasses on. Several hundred feet or perhaps a thousand feet down, one catches a glimpse of forests and rivers snaking away, a small town in a bay in the distance, as when you see them from an aeroplane. Prosperous and orderly. The man is Asian and he has a smile on his face. The sound of subway trains are heard already and we find ourselves in the belly of the earth in Vancouver. Latin American workers in 2006, hired temporarily, ploughing through the underground to set up the tube rail. I emphasize this is 2006. Not 1880s or before when mostly Chinese and some Indian workers were brought in to make the rail lines across Canada.

These pictures are in colour. The workers wear luminescent safety gear and equipment. They are not the “coolies” we have seen, in sandals, with pick axes, in diffused black and white pictures from the past. But, the workers in the coloured pictures make $3:50 per hour, a balding, kind faced Union organizer informs us with great sadness. He goes on to say “These people are all gone. This tube line will be around for at least one hundred years. But these nameless people are gone.” He continues: “Our view of Canada is that we are a multicultural country. We do not exploit workers. We are shocked. This cannot be like what happened 140 years ago, when we brought in coolies, slaves!”

Well, welcome to the new Canada!

Read more at: “The end of immigration?” –The film · Montreal Serai.

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Megweetch, where ever you are, dear Claude (1953-2012)

I first met Claude Otter when I worked at the CBC-Radio Canada in Montreal during the 1980s. I was the researcher on the early morning show and I would meet him coming out of the Cree-language show just down the hall. I enjoyed his infectious smile and laugh, his eager willingness to pull my leg, his constant supply of new jokes… and the practically non-stop stories about his beloved community.

He particularly enjoyed telling me about spending time in the bush, and the experiences of his father, grandfather and grandmother. I could practically smell the fresh air and hear the calls of the geese and moose when Claude was speaking.

Malcolm and Claude Otter x350

Claude Otter (right) and I at March 8 demonstration in Montréal.

We got to know each other better when I went north and spent time on the reserve in Mistassini. I was supposed to be teaching radio, but it was mainly a learning experience for me, with Claude as one of the main teachers.

I remember when I arrived in Mistassini and was getting settled in on my first day when I saw a fishing rod in the corner. Now, I love fishing, but I am used to not catching much. This time I threw my line in and suddenly something big grabbed the other end, catching me totally by surprise. I reeled it in, the biggest fish I had ever caught. I got help filleting the fish… enjoying a wonderful fresh meal my first night on the reserve. I learned the joys of eating beaver, bear, goose, sturgeon and other culinary wonders of the region.

Claude would always tell the story about the day I was driving the community pick up to a local community gathering. I had to back up and he and a group of locals were helping direct me. “Keep going,” they said, “a little more… a little faster!”  Pretty soon I had backed up onto an oil drum, lifting the back wheels off the ground so they were spinning madly in the air… to the great amusement of Claude and the other onlookers.

My partner Marie and I remember fondly the birth of son Gabriel, now 19, and our visits with the proud parents, Hélène Caron and Claude.

For many years Claude and I had talked about me joining him in Matagami and Waswanipi for an extended stay. That didn’t happen, and I visit under sadder circumstances. But I am glad to be able to make the trip here and meet all of you and put people and faces and places to the stories Claude told me. It has also been wonderful to catch up on the years that have flown by on the ride up here from Montreal with Hélène and Gabriel Caron-Otter. Continuer la lecture / Continue reading Megweetch, where ever you are, dear Claude (1953-2012)

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Return to Manila: featuring Elenita Ordonez

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